How are vinyl banners made?

A vinyl banner is made of a thin, flexible sheet of plastic material with a coating on one side. The coating can be any color, but is generally white or transparent.

How are vinyl banners made?

A vinyl banner is made of a thin, flexible sheet of plastic material with a coating on one side. The coating can be any color, but is generally white or transparent. Vinyl banners are often used as signs for outdoor advertising, at trade shows, and in other environments that require large outdoor graphics to be displayed. Vinyl banners can be made of the above-mentioned materials in two ways.

One is to dip or coat the polyester mesh with a heated vinyl mixture. The other is through lamination of the mesh using two vinyl sheets on each side. It's worth mentioning that higher fiber density translates to increased banner durability, in most cases. These banners can be printed in a variety of ways, including large format inkjet printing, screen printing, painting and vinyl lettering.

Interior banners can be cleaned regularly with water and detergents, while vehicle banners are likely to come into contact with fuels. Water and chemical resistance shows the ability of a banner to withstand water, different chemicals and cleaning products, with which it may come in contact. It is worth mentioning that the lamination method results in a cheaper banner compared to the dipping or coating method. They can be used to print not only vinyl banners, but also for outdoor and indoor applications, wall paper, canvas, textiles, films, traffic signs and others.

And, since these displays are often seen at close range, a typical mesh banner medium will likely not produce satisfactory print quality. In the case of scratch and abrasion resistance, tests show that when an anti-scratch agent is added to the HP latex ink, the vinyl sign provides a high level of scratch resistance. The eyelets are the nickel holes that allow the banner to be hung on fence posts, walls or on the sides of buildings. The coating dipping process is to feed the polyester mesh to a coater, which covers the mesh with a hot vinyl mixture that generally contains polymeric plasticizer.

Banners printed with eco-solvent ink require lamination compared to latex ink prints, which offer vivid and durable ready-to-use prints. A package such as LXI Master, Master Plus, CorelDRAW or Flexi-Sign will allow you to create distinctive designs that sell banners and work well for your customers. The main caveat with roll up banner displays is that unhemmed edges tend to curl if you use lightweight mesh. The weights of the different banner substrates range from as light as 9 ounces to as heavy as 22 ounces per square yard (900 g/m2), and can be double-sided or single-sided.

Vanessa Nitchman
Vanessa Nitchman

Unapologetic bacon advocate. General pop culture scholar. Extreme zombie fanatic. General twitter ninja. Lifelong beer fan. Professional internet scholar.

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